German minority in Slovenia continues to fight for recognition



For the “autochthonous minorities” (as they are called in the Slovenian minority statute) such as the Italians and Hungarians, Slovenia is not a bad country to live in. Excellent provisions in the core areas of minority protection and well-developed cultural autonomy have to be mentioned here. Of course the challenges are in the details. Cuts of 10% in budgets for the coming years were announced and in the case of territorial reforms of one municipality in the minority area the minority was not decisively involved in decision-making. Nevertheless for these two minorities Slovenia belongs to the top-countries in Europe.

In its report the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention refers explicitly and repeatedly to the positive developments in regard to the Roma. That is very encouraging! As in all the states of Central and Eastern Europe the Roma are also in Slovenia the number one challenge. 14 Million people belong to one of the many Roma or Sinti-groups in Europe. Many of them are living under appalling living condition. Europe does not have a solution for this large group of its citizens, with their many problems.

Despite encouraging developments in Slovenia, the situation of the Roma especially in the Dolenjska region remains very problematic (no running water, no housing, discrimination, racism, etcetera).

The report furthermore criticises the lack of opportunity to complain against discrimination, the failure to implement existing legislation and the lack of will and rejection on the local and regional level to implement the minority provisions.

Additionally, there is one autochthonous minority in Slovenia that continues to be ignored and whose wish to be recognised is negated. This is the German minority (also called: German-speaking, old-Austrian, Gottschee Germans). This tiny group (according to Christoph Pan about 2,000 persons) has been trying to obtain recognition for its status as autochthonous minority for many years. Recently the minorities of Europe publicly criticised this situation at the FUEN-Congress of 2010 in Ljubljana and in the presence of Slovenian President Danilo Türk. But nothing has changed.

Another problem in Slovenia is the classification of “the people belonging to the new communities”. With these words not the immigrants or so-called “new minorities” are meant. No, these are those people who come from the republics of the former Yugoslavia and have been living in Slovenia for decades (for example Croats, Serbs, Albanians). These however are not recognised as minorities.

Ljubljana can be proud for its very far-reaching system of minority protection, especially the direct and special benefits for staff in institutions or in the judiciary who speak a minority language (they receive a bonus to their salary) are music to the ears of many representatives of minorities from other regions.

However, it remains a stain on the minority diploma of this small country that it is not able to agree on the not just symbolically very important recognition of its own autochthonous minority, the Germans.

Other resources:
Christoph Pan & Beate Sybille Pfeil: Minderheitenrechte in Europa. Handbuch der europäischen Volksgruppen. Bd. 2 (in German)


For the “autochthonous minorities” (as they are called in the Slovenian minority statute) such as the Italians and Hungarians, Slovenia is not a bad country to live in. Excellent provisions in the core areas of minority protection and well-developed cultural autonomy have to be mentioned here. Of course the challenges are in the details. Cuts of 10% in budgets for the coming years were announced and in the case of territorial reforms of one municipality in the minority area the minority was not decisively involved in decision-making. Nevertheless for these two minorities Slovenia belongs to the top-countries in Europe.

In its report the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention refers explicitly and repeatedly to the positive developments in regard to the Roma. That is very encouraging! As in all the states of Central and Eastern Europe the Roma are also in Slovenia the number one challenge. 14 Million people belong to one of the many Roma or Sinti-groups in Europe. Many of them are living under appalling living condition. Europe does not have a solution for this large group of its citizens, with their many problems.

Despite encouraging developments in Slovenia, the situation of the Roma especially in the Dolenjska region remains very problematic (no running water, no housing, discrimination, racism, etcetera).

The report furthermore criticises the lack of opportunity to complain against discrimination, the failure to implement existing legislation and the lack of will and rejection on the local and regional level to implement the minority provisions.

Additionally, there is one autochthonous minority in Slovenia that continues to be ignored and whose wish to be recognised is negated. This is the German minority (also called: German-speaking, old-Austrian, Gottschee Germans). This tiny group (according to Christoph Pan about 2,000 persons) has been trying to obtain recognition for its status as autochthonous minority for many years. Recently the minorities of Europe publicly criticised this situation at the FUEN-Congress of 2010 in Ljubljana and in the presence of Slovenian President Danilo Türk. But nothing has changed.

Another problem in Slovenia is the classification of “the people belonging to the new communities”. With these words not the immigrants or so-called “new minorities” are meant. No, these are those people who come from the republics of the former Yugoslavia and have been living in Slovenia for decades (for example Croats, Serbs, Albanians). These however are not recognised as minorities.

Ljubljana can be proud for its very far-reaching system of minority protection, especially the direct and special benefits for staff in institutions or in the judiciary who speak a minority language (they receive a bonus to their salary) are music to the ears of many representatives of minorities from other regions.

However, it remains a stain on the minority diploma of this small country that it is not able to agree on the not just symbolically very important recognition of its own autochthonous minority, the Germans.

Other resources:
Christoph Pan & Beate Sybille Pfeil: Minderheitenrechte in Europa. Handbuch der europäischen Volksgruppen. Bd. 2 (in German)

Minority protection in (times of) crisis – exert pressure on Greece



You rightly may feel sorry for the people in Greece. Because of mistakes they did not cause, but were the result of the negligence on the part of a political elite, the whole country has to undergo painful reforms. That the rescue operations rather save the creditors than help the citizens of this Balkan state who are suffering hardship now, is only mentioned in passing. There is now a strong intervention in the self-image of the country and the population. Institutions and laws are being transformed and many far-reaching changes are implemented as a result of external pressure.

In times of financial horror stories during which there are “no alternatives”, this may sound naive: why is the European Union not using the crisis in a country “balancing on the brink of the abyss” to increase the pressure in order to solve even more profound, societal problems. Foremost the approach to minorities, which defies any description. Why are neither the European Council (the heads of state and governments), nor the European Commission or the European Parliament urging Greece to recognise the minorities living in the Greek state who they are?

Greece denies that there are minorities in Greece.

Only the “Muslim minority” has been recognised as such according to the Treaty of Lausanne from the year 1923. The Pomaks (Bulgarian-speaking Muslims), the Muslim Roma and the Turkish minority, who together form the group behind this generic label, are not recognised as national minorities. Even worse (if possible) is the situation of the Macedonian minority – whose existence is totally negated:
”There is no ‘Macedonian’ minority in Greece” is the short, and untruthful, reaction of the Greek state to the report of the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe, Thomas Hammarberg, after his latest visit to Greece in 2008.

For many years the country has been heavily criticed for its mistaken or non-existing minority policy, and not only by NGOs such as FUEN. International organisations and their monitoring mechanisms, judicial rulings, expert opinions etcetera are intentionally ignored or overlooked in Athens.

The subject of minorities in Greece is (as is often the case in minority issues) very much charged with emotions. This is aggravated by the widely spread xenophobia and hostility against foreigners in Greece.

“Greek civil society considers the presence of aliens as a danger. It has the tendency to relate ethnical questions with military affairs because of the fact that Greece repeatedly has been in war with the “mother country” of its (Muslim) minority, i.e. Turkey.” (Christoph Pan)

By contrast the minorities in Greece, which now make up about 0.5 percent of the total population and form the majority in no region (anymore), do not demand far-reaching autonomy nor show any separatist tendencies. They “just” want the recognition as a minority and the application of a system of modern minority protection. But Greece – often including the opinion of its general public – does not want to think about changing its minority policies.

How emotionally charged the subject is, became crystal clear at the European football championship for the minorities organised by FUEN, the EUROPEADA, that took place at the Sorbian minority in Germany lately. A team of the Turkish minority – the Western Thrace Turks – took part. This led to fierce hostile attacks in the media and on the internet. It included threats and intervention by Greek journalists (sic!) that the team would invoke an “international crisis” because of the participation of the Turkish minority at a reception of the Prime-Minister of the Free State of Saxony (by the way, the PM himself is part of the Sorbian minority).

This leads to the question why human rights – and part of these are these minority issues – are playing no role in the debate on the future of Greece? It is exclusively about a quick fix to the economic crisis and not about the compliance with fundamental rights – see Article 2 of the Treaty on European Union.

Of course in reality it cannot be (or can it?) that Mrs Merkel and her colleagues suggest in a friendly but persistent way to the right persons in Athens that next to reforming their tax system, they should pay some attention to the issue of minority protection. This being a “naive” assumption shows very clear that minority protection is in a difficult situation (in times of crisis) in Europe.

If you want to have an overview of the current problems of the minorities, you should read the report of Mr Hammarberg, the Commissioner for Human Rights of the Council of Europe. The report is diplomatic but also very descriptive.

The resolution submitted by ABTTF and the Western Thrace Minority University Graduates Association, and adopted at the FUEN Congress in Moscow on 19 May 2012, provides an overview about the current demands on the part of the Turkish minority (see below).

Last, but not least, the very complex history and many antagonisms connected to the issue of minorities in Greece should be mentioned. A good introduction is the article by Tilman Zülch in the “Pogrom”-magazine by the Society of Threatened Peoples, from which the last paragraph is quoted here:

“... every approach to the Greek minority problems requires a look in the direction of Turkey. All the Turkish governments disregarded the Treaty of Lausanne. In the 1950s and still in the 1970s there have been atrocious pogroms against the Greeks from Istanbul/Constantinople and from the islands of Imbros and Tendos. Since 1974, 80% of the inhabitants of North Cyprus have to live as refugees in the Greek southern part of the island. Even half of the Turkish Cypriots left North Cyprus, which is occupied by the Turkish military. Looking at all these facts together our demand for tolerance towards the minorities in Greece becomes all the more credible.”


Resources:
Christoph Pan & Beate Sibylle Pfeil; “Minderheitenrechte in Europa. Handbuch der europäischen Volksgruppen” (in German)



Photo:

Deutsche Minderheit in Slowenien kämpft weiter um Anerkennung



Slowenien ist für die „autochthonen Minderheiten“ der Italiener und Ungarn (wie diese in dem slowenischen Minderheitengesetz genannt werden) kein schlechtes Pflaster. Vorbildliche Regelungen in den Kernbereichen des Minderheitenschutzes mit einer gut ausgebauten kulturellen Autonomie gilt es hervorzuheben.  

Natürlich liegen die Herausforderungen im Detail. So wurden bereits 10% Finanzkürzungen in den nächsten Jahren angekündigt und bei der Neugliederung einer Gemeinde im Minderheitengebiet wurde die Minderheit nicht ausreichend bei der Entscheidungsfindung mit einbezogen. Nichtsdestotrotz gehört Slowenien für diese beiden genannten Minderheiten zur Spitzenklasse in Europa.


Der sog. Beratende Ausschuss zum Rahmenübereinkommen verweist in dem Bericht ausdrücklich und mehrmals auf die positive Entwicklung im Bereich der Roma. Das ist sehr erfreulich! Die Roma sind wie in allen Staaten Mittel- und Osteuropas auch in Slowenien die Herausforderungen Nummer eins. 14 Millionen Menschen gehören einer der zahlreichen Roma oder Sinti-Gruppen in Europa an. Viele von ihnen leben unter zum Teil erbärmlichen Bedingungen. Europa hat für diese große Gruppe ihrer Bürger, mit den vielen Problemen, keine Lösung. (siehe auch das Roma-Projekt der FUEV „Minderheiten helfen Minderheiten“)

Trotz der erfreulichen Tendenzen in Slowenien, bleibt die Situation der Roma vor allem in der Region Dolenjska / Unterkrain weiterhin sehr problematisch (kein fließend Wasser, kein Wohnraum, Diskriminierung, Rassismus etc.).

Im Bericht wir darüber hinaus die fehlenden Möglichkeiten zur Klage gegen Diskriminierung und die mangelhafte Umsetzung geltender Gesetzgebung sowie der fehlende Wille / die Ablehnung auf lokaler und regionaler Ebene die Minderheitenregelungen umzusetzen, kritisiert.

Darüber hinaus gibt es jedoch eine autochthone Minderheit in Slowenien, die wird weiterhin ignoriert und ihr Wunsch nach Anerkennung negiert. Die deutsche Minderheit (auch deutschsprachige Minderheit, alt-österreicher, Gottscheer). Diese kleine Gruppe (nach Christoph Pan rund 2.000 Personen) versucht seit Jahren die Anerkennung als autochthone Minderheit zu erlangen. Zuletzt zum FUEV-Kongress 2010 in Ljubljana / Laibach im Beisein des Staatspräsidenten Danilo Turk wurde dies von den Minderheiten Europas öffentlich kritisiert. Doch geändert hat sich nichts.

Ein weiteres Problem in Slowenien ist die Zuordnung der „Angehörigen der neuen Gemeinschaften“. Damit sind nicht Immigranten oder sog. „neue Minderheiten“ gemeint. Gemeint sind diejenigen, die aus Teilrepubliken des ehemaligen Jugoslawiens kommen und in Slowenien schon seit Jahrzehnten leben (zum Beispiel Kroaten, Serben, Albaner). Diese werden ebenfalls nicht als Minderheiten anerkannt.

Ljubljana kann sich durchaus rühmen einen sehr weitreichenden Minderheitenschutz zu vorzuhalten, vor allem die direkte Sondervergünstigung von Mitarbeitern in den Ämtern oder Richter etc., die eine Minderheitensprache sprechen (diese erhalten einen Gehaltszuschlag) klingen wie Musik in den Ohren vieler Minderheitenvertretern aus anderen Regionen.

Es bleibt aber weiterhin ein Makel auf dem Minderheitenzeugnis des kleinen Landes, dass man sich nicht für eine nicht nur symbolisch sehr wichtige Anerkennung ihrer autochthonen Minderheiten der Deutschen durchringen kann.

Weitere Quellen:
Christoph Pan. Minderheitenrechte in Europa. Handbuch der europäischen Volksgruppen. Bd. 2

Minderheitenschutz in (Zeiten) der Krise – Griechenland unter Druck setzen



Die Menschen in Griechenland können einem zu Recht leidtun. Wegen Fehlern, die sie nicht verursacht haben, sondern die dem fahrlässigen Verhalten einer politischen Elite geschuldet sind, muss ein ganzes Land schmerzliche Reformen durchlaufen. Dass bei den sog. Rettungsaktionen eher die Gläubiger abgesichert werden, als den in Not geratenen Bürgern des Balkanstaates geholfen werden soll, sei nur am Rande erwähnt. Dabei wird tief in das Selbstverständnis des Landes und der Bevölkerung eingreifen. Institutionen und Gesetze werden umgekrempelt sowie viele weit reichende Änderungen durch Druck von außen umgesetzt.

Es mag in Zeiten der finanziellen Horrormeldungen, wo alles „alternativlos“ daherkommt, naiv klingen: warum nutzt die Europäische Union nicht die Krise des Landes, das „am Abgrund balanciert“, um den Druck zur Lösung der noch tiefer liegenden, gesellschaftlichen Probleme zu verstärken. Hier sei der jeder Beschreibung spottende  Umgang mit den Minderheiten hervorgehoben. Warum fordern weder der Europäische Rat (die Staats- und Regierungschefs), die Europäische Kommission oder das Europäische Parlament Griechenland dazu auf, die auf ihrem Staatsgebiet lebenden Minderheiten als solche auch anzuerkennen.

Griechenland bestreitet, dass es in Griechenland Minderheiten gibt.

Einzig die „muslimische Minderheit“ ist nach dem Vertrag von Lusanne aus dem Jahr 1923 als solche anerkannt. Die sich dahinter verbergenden Pomaken (bulgarisch-sprechende Muslime) und die muslimischen Roma sowie die türkische Minderheit werden allesamt nicht als nationale Minderheiten anerkannt. Schlimmer noch (wenn dies überhaupt möglich ist) geht es der mazedonischen Minderheit – deren Existenz ganz verneint wird:
„There is no ´Macedonien´ minority in Greece“ heißt es so konzis, wie unwahr in der Anmerkung des griechischen Staates auf den Bericht des Menschenrechtskommissars des Europarates, Thomas Hammarberg, nach seinem letzten Besuch in Griechenland 2008.

Das Land steht seit Jahren am „Minderheiten-Pranger“ und wird dort nicht nur von den NGO´s, wie der FUEV, für ihre verfehlte bzw. nicht vorhandene Minderheitenpolitik kritisiert. Internationale Organisationen und deren Überwachungsmechanismen, Gerichtsurteile, Expertenmeinungen etc. werden geflissentlich in Athen ignoriert oder überhört.

Das Thema der Minderheiten in Griechenland ist (wie so oft in Minderheitenfragen) sehr emotional aufgeladen. Hinzu kommt, dass die Fremdenangst und Fremdenfeindlichkeit in Griechenland weit verbreitet ist.

„Die griechische Zivilgesellschaft begreift die Anwesenheit vom Fremden als Gefahr. Sie tendiert dazu der ethnischen Problematik einen militärischen Anstrich beizumengen wegen des Umstandes, dass Griechenland mehrmals in Kriegen mit dem „Mutterland“ seiner (muslimischen) Minderheit, dh mit der Türkei, verwickelt war.“ (Christoph Pan)
 
Dabei fordern die Minderheiten in Griechenland, die nur rund 0,5 Prozent der Gesamt-Bevölkerung ausmachen und dabei in keiner Region die Mehrheit (mehr) bilden – weder weitreichende Autonomie geschweige äußern sie separatistische Tendenzen, sondern sie wollen „nur“ die Anerkennung als Minderheit und die Anwendung eines modernen Minderheitenschutzes.  Doch Griechenland – leider gilt das auch häufig für die öffentliche Meinung – denkt nicht daran, ihre Minderheitenpolitik zu ändern.

Wie emotional das Thema ist, wurde bei der kürzlich von der FUEV veranstalteten Fußballeuropameisterschaft der Minderheiten, der EUROPEADA, bei den Sorben in der Lausitz, Deutschland, deutlich. Dort nahm eine Mannschaft der türkischen Minderheit – der Westthrakien Türken – teil. Das führte zu heftigen Anfeindungen in den Medien und im Internet. Auch mit Drohungen, man beschwöre eine „internationale Krise“ herauf, wurde von griechischen Journalisten (sic!) gegen eine Teilnahme der Delegation der türkischen Minderheit bei einem Empfang des Ministerpräsidenten des Freistaates Sachsen interveniert (der ganz am Rande vermerkt als Sorbe selbst einer Minderheit angehört).

Hier nun stellt sich die Frage, warum die Menschenrechte - denn ein Bestandteil dieser sind die Minderheitenfragen - keine Rolle in der Debatte über die Zukunft Griechenlands spielen? Es dreht sich einzig und allein, um eine schnelle Regelung der ökonomischen Krise, nicht um die Einhaltung der Grundwerte - sprich Artikel 2 des Vertrages über die Europäische Union.

Es läuft natürlich nicht so (oder vielleicht doch?) dass Frau Merkel und ihre Kollegen in Athen den richtigen Menschen ganz freundlich aber hartnäckig nahe legen, dass man doch bitte den Frage des Minderheitenschutzes neben der Reform des Steuerrechtes auch etwas Aufmerksamkeit schenken müsse. Dass dies eine „naive“ Vermutung ist, zeigt um so deutlicher, dass es der Minderheitenschutz in Europa in (Zeiten) der Krise sehr schwer hat.


Wer sich einen Überblick über die aktuellen Probleme der Minderheiten verschaffen möchte, der kann das – diplomatisch aber sehr anschaulich - in dem Bericht von Herrn Hammarberg, dem Menschenrechtskommissar des Europarates tun.

Eine Überblick über die aktuellen Forderungen der türkischen Minderheit bietet die Resolution, des ABTTF und der Western Thrace Minority University Graduates Association, beides Mitglieder der FUEV, die am 19. Mai 2012 anlässlich des FUEV-Kongresses in Moskau verabschiedet wurde. (siehe unten)

Zu guter Letzt sei auf die sehr komplexe Geschichte(n) und die vielen Gegensätze, die mit den Fragen der Minderheiten in Griechenland verbunden sind, verwiesen. Eine gute Einführung findet sich in dem Artikel von Tilman Zülch in der Zeitschrift „Pogrom“ von der Gesellschaft für bedrohte Völker, aus der zum Abschluss zitiert werden soll:

„... jede Beschäftigung mit den griechischen Minderheitenproblemen bedarf eines Blickes in Richtung Türkei. Alle türkischen Regierungen haben den Vertrag von Lusanne missachtet. In den 50er und sogar noch 70er Jahren des 20. Jahrhunderts kam es zu schrecklichen Pogromen an den Griechen von Istanbul / Konstantinopel und den Inseln Imbros und Tendos. Seit 1974 müssen 80 Prozent der Bevölkerung Nordzyperns als Flüchtlinge im griechischen Südteil der Insel leben. Sogar die Hälfte der türkischen Zyprioten hat das von türkischem Militär besetzte Nordzypern verlassen. Wenn wir diese Tatsachen im Auge haben, werden unsere Forderung nach Toleranz für die Minderheiten in Griechenland umso glaubwürdiger.

Quellen:
Christoph Pan; „Minderheitenrechte in Europa. Handbuch der europäischen Volksgruppen“